Therefore

Jack Roeda

READ : 1 Peter 1:10-16 “Therefore, prepare your minds for action; be self-controlled; set your hope fully on the grace to be given you when Jesus Christ is revealed.” (v. 13 NIV) When there is a “therefore,” it’s good to ask what it’s there for. Here the “therefore” is there to remind us that this command for holiness is grounded in all that Peter has said so far, things so amazing that “even angels long to look into these things” …

In Hope

Jack Roeda

READ : 1 Peter 1:3-9 In his great mercy he has given us new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. (v. 3 NIV) In The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood describes a futuristic society in which the heroine comes upon an ancient graveyard. One of the grave stones has an anchor on it, an hourglass, and the words “In Hope.” She wonders: “Why did they put that above a dead person? Was it …

A Non-Anxious Presence

Jack Roeda

READ : 1 Peter 1:1-9 Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ, to God’s elect, strangers in the world. (v. 1 NIV) One of the best gifts a leader can bring to a difficult situation is a non-anxious presence; it’s an inner calm, an unthreatened demeanor, staying centered on the main thing and preserving a sense of hope. Such a non-anxious presence also seems most fitting for Christians and churches to bring to each other and to a troubled world. There …

Thanks!

Jack Roeda

READ : Philippians 4:10-23 Not that I seek the gift. (v. 17) Each time Paul expresses appreciation for the Philippians’ gift to him, he adds, “not that . . . “ (vv. 11, 17)—as if to say, “Thank you, but I was doing fine.” Is this bad manners? The ancient world spoke of three kinds of friendships—the pleasant, the useful, and the good. The “good” friendship was the best because it had no strings attached. “Useful” friendships—i.e., those where people …

Contentment

Jack Roeda

READ : Philippians 4:10-17 For I have learned to be content with whatever I have. (v. 11) And you wonder: how did he learn it? Did it come easy to him or was it hard? Did it come to him overnight, or was it something he learned over many years? And how did he learn it? Was it in the school of hard knocks, or was it through some profound religious experience? “I have learned to be content.” Our question …

A Filter

Jack Roeda

READ : Philippians 4:8-9 Finally, beloved, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is pleasing, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence and if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. (v. 8) When Paul tells us to “think about these things,” the kind of thinking he means is “a focused consideration of something.” He wants us to continually focus our thoughts on these virtues as we navigate our way …