Beyond Work

Marc Baer

READ : Genesis 1 And God saw everything that he had made, and behold, it was very good. (v. 31) For Dorothy Sayers, the only work worthy of a Christian is good work, done well. In her plays, novels, and essays, she tackled the subject of work. Cultivating a biblical understanding of work will change forever how we view what we do. Sayers believed one of the most fundamental questions facing humanity was how to think about work. She pointed …

From Success to Significance

Marc Baer

READ : John 1:9-13 But to all who did receive him, who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God. (v. 12) From a young age the twentieth-century novelist Dorothy Sayers exhibited an aptitude for writing. At the age of 13 she wrote and produced a play. But her faith did not mature until after her writing career took off. During her childhood Sayers was at best a nominal Christian. At school she began to …

Learning to See the Unseen

Marc Baer

READ : 2 Corinthians 4:7-18 For the things that are seen are transient, but the things that are unseen are eternal. (v. 18) G. K. Chesterton became a pagan at 12, an agnostic at 16, and in his late teens experimented with the occult. While studying at the University of London near the end of the nineteenth century, Chesterton encountered a spiritual darkness that left him depressed. The more he read, the less his era’s unlimited optimism about achieving human …

Our Callings Can Change

Marc Baer

READ : Hebrews 11:1-4 And through his faith, though he died, he still speaks. (v. 4) Oswald Chambers served as principal and lecturer at the Bible college; Biddy served as “Lady Superintendent,” taught, extended hospitality, and transcribed almost every lecture her husband gave. When Oswald left for Egypt in 1915, Biddy and their young daughter soon followed. While in Egypt Biddy gave lectures and sermons and practiced hospitality. She also shaped the text of a book her husband published in …

A Joint Calling

Marc Baer

READ : Deuteronomy 1:21 Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged. (NIV) Gertrude Hobbs was the daughter of a London clerk. “Biddy,” the nickname bestowed on her by Oswald Chambers, spent her childhood years suffering from bronchitis. Weakened by illness, she left school for good in her early teens but later took a shorthand correspondence course. Biddy achieved the remarkable rate of taking down more than 250 words per minute—near the maximum of what was physically possible. After her …