The New Creation

David Bast

Read: Isaiah 65:17-25

And he who was seated on the throne said, “Behold, I am making all things new.” (Rev. 21:5)

In Isaiah 65, the life of the world to come is described as life on earth, but with all the tragedies and sorrows removed once and for all. Much of what we’re told about the new creation is what is not there: no stillborn infants, no premature deaths, no sounds of weeping. The new creation means life without pain, misery, frustration, or loss.

In the world to come, suffering will be replaced with glory. In fact, the Bible says that whatever suffering we experience now isn’t worth comparing with the glory that will be then

(2 Cor. 4:17). Suffering is temporary, but glory is forever. In the coming world, futility will give way to freedom. The creation itself is going to be “set free from its bondage to corruption” (Rom. 8:21). The new creation will mean the end of all the things that frustrate us and spoil our happiness here and now. There will be no loss. There will be no more goodbyes.

But how can we even begin to imagine this new universe, where wolves and lambs graze peacefully together, and lions feast with cattle instead of upon them? That would seem to require some pretty radical reengineering of nature. The Bible suggests there will be great changes in the world to come. God does say he will make all things new. But it will still be our world, and—more importantly—his. —David Bast

As you pray, ask the Lord to make all things new, starting with yourself.